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Core Ideas

Citizens

Democracy requires responsible citizens who can make sound decisions about their future, and can act on these decisions. Through joint learning exchanges, Kettering studies how citizens might accept their responsibility, make sound decisions about what is in the public’s interest, and join forces to act on those decisions.

Communities

Democracy requires a community, or a society of citizens, that can work together. We research the way citizens face persistent problems in their communities. These problems, such as poverty, violence, and gaps in educational achievement, require citizens, communities, and institutions to work together to address them.

Institutions

Democracy requires institutions with public legitimacy that contribute to strengthening society. While institutions can affect the public’s ability to govern itself, they can also unintentionally weaken self-rule by substituting expert knowledge for public knowledge. Aligning institutional routines with citizens’ work is the central challenge. 

Kettering Foundation News

Higher Education Leaders: Reconstructing the Public Purposes of Higher Education

Written by: Kettering Staff

Notes and Reflections on the July 2019 Meeting 

By Keith Melville and Derek Barker

Announcing the Hidden Common Ground Initiative

Written by: Kettering Staff

A major initiative spearheaded by Public Agenda and USA TODAY.

A Public Voice 2019

Written by: Kettering Staff

A Public Voice was held at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, on May 9.

Connections 2018: Letter from the Editors

Written by: Kettering Staff

A letter from Melinda Gilmore & Randall Nielsen.

John R. Dedrick Named Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Kettering Foundation

Written by: Kettering Staff

John R. Dedrick has been named executive vice president and chief operating officer of the Charles F. Kettering Foundation.